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Joseph Natterson MD The Loving Self

The Loving Self is a way of describing a person’s complex psychosocial being. When we think of the loving self, we come to a better understanding of our true potential, of our sense of ourselves and of our relationship to each other and the world in which we live. (177 pgs)

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Daniel Offer & Melvin Sabshin The Concept of Normality

The authors delineate the perspectives of normality, evaluate some of the research on normal populations and point to directions that may further elucidate the issues. They describe four major perspectives on normality:  normality as health, normality as utopia, normality as average and normality as process. (37 pgs)

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Joseph F. Rychlak The Personality

All theories of personality must deal with: basic philosophical questions, the major schools of personality theory, classical answers to the classical questions, and, finally, what is personality? The term "personality" assumes a humanly dialectical intelligence, which can take in meaningful experience, consider alternatives and then project a plan, hypothesis, goal, aim, intention, purpose for the sake of which it behaves. (68 pgs)

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Donald A. Bloch The Family of the Psychiatric Patient

Family therapy originated in child psychiatry, drew important technical skills from play therapy, group therapy, and psychodrama, with more recent additions from the encounter and training group fields. On the theoretical side it has drawn from psychoanalytic theory, from anthropological and sociological studies and from cybernetics, general systems theory, linguistics and kinesics. This survey focuses on psychiatric  disorder: as an exogenous stress on the family, and as caused by pathogenic relationships in the family.  (66 pgs)

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Howard S. Baker Shorter-Term Psychotherapy: A Self Psychological Approach

(66 pgs)

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Lorna Smith Benjamin Brief SASB Directed Reconstructive Learning Therapy

This method consists of the interpretation of psychotherapy as a learning experience and the use of Structural Analysis of Social Behavior to describe patterns, etiology, wishes, fears, treatment interventions and the effects of interventions. This view assumes that mental disorder represents an adaptation to previous interpersonal dilemmas, rather than a "breakdown". (70 pgs)

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Henry Pinsker, Richard Rosenthal, Leigh McCullough Dynamic Supportive Psychotherapy

Supportive psychotherapy is probably the most widely practice treatment for psychiatric patients.  The mandate is to set explicit goals and a clear agenda. Change stems from learning and from the identification with an accepting, well-related therapist, not through resolution of unconscious conflicts. A good outcome of therapy is increased self-esteem, reduction in experienced anxiety, and a resultant increase in adaptive functioning. (50 pgs)

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Jerome Pollack, Walter Flegenheimer, Arnold Winston Brief Adaptive Psychotherapy

This approach is designed for avoidant, dependent, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive and passive-aggressive personality disorders. It is in the transference that the maladaptive pattern can be most clearly seen, explicated and understood.  It is in the transference that the patient's pathology will be most apparent to the patient and most available for real work. (40 pgs)

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John D. Rainer The Genetics of Man in Health and Mental Illness

Once the research tools and conceptual frameworks became available, psychiatry, too, finally accepted genetics as one of its foundation stones. Gene influences can now be more readily conceived as continuously interaction in human development rather than as mutually exclusive. Influences and interactions take place developmentally at various levels of biological organization: the atomic and molecular, the cellular and systemic, the psychodynamic, the familial, the demographic and the social. (72 pgs)

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Mardi J. Horowitz Short-Term Dynamic Therapy of Stress Response Syndromes

Treatment of stress response syndromes is centered on completing the information processing cycles initiated by the stress and sometimes this includes facilitation of warding off maneuvers, just as at other times the patient will be helped to set aside unconscious defensive operations.  Transference and core neurotic conflicts will be interpreted according to their real relationship to the current stress. This will permit a clear focus for brief therapy.

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Alfred H. Rifkin A General Assessment of Psychiatry

The most significant task is to identify central themes and problems and the strategies devised to explore them.  There are many lines of cleavage: organic versus psychogenic, heredity versus culture, psychotherapy versus chemotherapy, depth analysis versus behavior symptom elimination, and the medial model versus game theory. Since history seldom moves as predicted, today's speculations will soon prove to be an acute embarrassment. (43 pgs)

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Jeffrey L. Binder & Hans H. Strupp The Vanderbilt Approach to Time-Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy
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Lester Luborsky & David Mark Short-Term Supportive-Expressive Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy

The main techniques are: being sensitive in allowing the patient to form a helping alliance, formulate and respond about the central relationship patterns, understand  and respond about where the symptom fits into the pattern, attend to and respond to concerns about getting involved in the therapy and then separating, responses should be timed in relation to the patient's awareness, frame the symptoms as problem-solving attempts and interventions should be limited in complexity and length. (47 pgs)

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Henri F. Ellenberger Psychiatry from Ancient to Modern Times

Modern psychiatry, like the other branches of science, is continually changing.  Today's discovery will soon be made obsolete by tomorrow's discovery. There is no theory of psychiatry without a knowledge of the history of psychiatry.  The outcome of 25 centuries of efforts is that the basic principles of psychiatry are in need of careful revisions. (76 pgs)

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Joseph Reppen Ph.D., Jane Tucker Ph.D., & Martin A Schulman Ph.D. Editors Way Beyond Freud : Postmodern Psychoanalysis Observed

This volume focuses on postmodern psychoanalysis.  The thirteen contributors engage the reader in a stimulating exchange and dialogue about the postmodern turn in psychoanalysis. They advocate, critique or simply observe this contemporary phenomenon with superb scholarship. The antecedents can be found in a wide range of authors from Ferenczi to Sullivan, who disdain reductionism, reject the concept of neutrality, and support a two-person psychology. This is a cutting-edge dialectic written by noted authorities.

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Michael Laikin, Arnold Winston, & Leigh McCullough Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy

This technique was developed by Habib Davanloo in order to break through the patient's defensive barrier. The major innovations which speed and intensify treatment are:  high therapist activity level, maintenance of focus, early and extensive analysis of the transference, analysis of character defenses, and  linkage of the therapist-patient relationship with other significant relationships in the patient's life. (55 pgs)

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Geir Nielsen & Karin Barth Short-Term Anxiety-Provoking Psychotherapy

STAPP is a focal, goal oriented, psychodynamic psychotherapy first developed by Peter Sifneos. Based on psychoanalytic principles it aims to resolve pathological psychic conflicts and help those suffering from them to learn new ways of being in their interpersonal relationships. The main features of this approach are brevity, emotional reeducation, problem solving and limited goals.  It is presupposed that the patient is able to cooperate in a therapeutic alliance and that he or she is able to benefit from an essentially interpretive, insight-oriented technique. (59 pgs)

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James Mann Time-Limited Psychotherapy

This psychoanalytically based psychotherapy requires the therapist to step out of the traditional mode. With its specific time limit and the concept of the central issue, this brings to the forefront of the treatment process the major psychological plague all human beings suffer, namely the wish to be close, to be as one with another, to be intimate, the fulfillment of which demands learning how to tolerate separation and loss without undue damage to our feelings about the self. (52 pgs)

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Ennio Cipani Ph.D. A Clinical Treatment Guide to 10 Common Pediatric Behavioral Problems

Clinicians serving families are regularly presented with parental complaints about child behavior management problems involving certain settings, daily activities, or time periods. Ten common behavioral pediatric problem areas (bedtime, eating, siblings, etc.) are addressed in this clinical resource. Each treatment package provides a number of parenting tips and suggestions that form the basis of the clinical intervention for that particular problem area. This resource material for clinicians is comprised of behaviorally-based solutions and includes data sheets and handouts for parents.

Downloads: 2091Publisher: International Psychotherapy Institute
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Helmut Thomä & Horst Kächele Psychoanalytic Practice: Vol 2: Clinical Studies

This second volume of Psychoanalytic Practice demonstrates  value and efficacy in treatment. Advances in psychoanalytic technique are linked to the critical collaboration with patients. Case histories from a period of more than thirty years are included, and in many cases it was possible to examine the effectiveness of psychoanalysis in long-term follow up studies. The theoretical framework provides orientation enabling one to see phenomena, hear words, read texts, and comprehend the connections between human experiencing and thinking. (1557 pgs)

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Benjamin B. Wolman & George Stricker Editors Anxiety and Related Disorders: A Handbook

There has been enormous progress in our understanding of the origins of clinical anxiety as well as in our ability to treat it, but there is yet no consensus as to its causes and cures.  Over the course of twenty-one chapters, distinguished representatives from most major schools of thought offer their approaches to and insights into etiology, dynamics, symptomatology, diagnosis, treatment  strategies, and more.

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Howard Gardner Ph.D. The Quest for Mind

Gardner examines the work of Jean Piaget, the developmental psychologist who brought the rigors of scientific procedure to the examination of the unfolding mental processes of the child and Claude Levi-Strauss, who revolutionized his discipline by establishing the universal aspects of thought processes and functions through his innovative study of primitive peoples.  Gardner comments as well on the work of such other structuralists as Noam Chomsky, Roman Jakobson and Edmund Leach.

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Chinese American Family Therapy: A New Model for Clinicians

Offers specific and effective guidelines for treating Chinese American individuals and families with respect, sensitivity and understanding. Jung examines these families within their culture of origin and offers an understanding of values, beliefs and customs that are rooted in Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism. The book offers a comprehensive multidimensional clinical approach in clear and concise terms.

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Michael Bloom Ph.D. Adolescent Parental Separation

Although adolescent-parental separation is a natural course of the life cycle, there is a close correlation of this process to bereavement, mourning, and grief.  Psychotherapy may involve reframing - what has been seen as rejecting and angry comes to be seen as a developmental process bringing great relief.  Through case history material, a comparison is made between normal and pathological adolescent-parental separation processes.

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Terry A. Kupers M.D. Revisioning Men's Lives: Gender, Intimacy, and Power
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Terry A. Kupers M.D. Ending Therapy: The Meaning of Termination

Does therapy go on too long? How can its success be judged?  What do therapists say about ending therapy? What is the role of economics? This book confronts these questions, exploring when, how, and why therapy ends.

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Nathan W. Ackerman and Marjorie L. Behrens Family Diagnosis and Clinical Process

Family diagnosis and family therapy are twin processes each dependent on the other. A conceptual framework is presented for family diagnosis, a guide that enables the comparison and contrast of family types. These themes are illustrated with clinical examples.

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Peter B. Neubauer Disorders of Early Childhood

It is only the intensive and careful exploration of the child's inner life - his fantasies, along with his defensive organization and its relationship to his external reality - that makes possible a clear diagnostic assessment of the child's condition.

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Reginald S. Lourie and Rebecca E. Rieger Psychiatric and Psychological Examination of Children

The basic components of a diagnostic study of children are the history, the psychiatric examination and psychological testing. The clinical team of psychiatric social worker, clinical psychologist and child psychiatrist traditionally divided these facets, but there has been considerable blurring of disciplinary lines and overlapping of functions.  Another area of information is in terms of how the child has moved along the lines of development including patterns of relationships and socializations both within and outside his family.  

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Albert J. Solnit Depression and Mourning in Childhood

In neurotic or reactive depressive conditions the aim of treatment is to help the child through play, verbalization and interpretations to experience the depressed state gradually in order to gain insight, overcome the trauma, and resolve the conflicts related to the depression.

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William Goldfarb Distinguishing and Classifying the Individual Schizophrenic Child

Childhood schizophrenia is a set of conditions apart from adult schizophrenia. A system of subdividing schizophrenic children is presented in which the dimensions employed reflect empirical experience as well as theoretic considerations.

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Eveoleen N. Rexford and Suzanne Taets van Amerongen Psychological Disorders of the Grade School Years

The growth process is the central focus and the child's symptomatology is a manifestation of disruption in it. Groupings of children's emotional disturbances are presented along with suggestions for therapeutic management. These are developmental irregularities or failures, psychoneuroses of childhood, psychoneuroses of childhood, and the personality disorders.

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E. James Anthony Child Therapy Techniques

The evidence suggests that all the various methods of psychotherapy with children are effective to a degree and that different techniques lead to changes of a different kind. Child therapy and the delinquent, the development of child analysts,non-directive psychotherapy, release therapy, suppressive therapy, projection therapy and conditioning therapy are discussed.

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Shirley Cooper Treatment of Parents

The family is the most significant shaping influence on its members and more particularly its children.  Work with parents in behalf of children requires careful assessment and differentiated treatment and disposition strategies.  Efforts to assist the child without engaging the parent through with the parent's needs and psychology are likely to fail.

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Salvador Minuchin Structural Family Therapy

A child presenting a symptom is presenting a symptom of family stress. If one broadens the focus, the forces within the family that maintain the symptom will appear and can be dealt with. Taking the child's ecosystem into account will combine the possibility of maximally potent interventions with preventive operations. This approach involves the least pain for the people involved and therefore becomes the most humanitarian as well as the most effective way of approaching a problem.

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Sidney L. Werkman Psychiatric Disorders of Adolescence

Symptoms must be assessed over time, seeing them in the context of the developmental periods and challenges of the adolescent and of understanding the social setting in which the behavior occurs.The adolescent is a constantly developing organism who needs support and medical and educational intervention in order to grow effectively and adaptively. Most of the disorders of adolescence can be seen as the result of unavailability of supportive help during developmental crises.

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E. James Anthony Psychotherapy of Adolescence

The relative weakness of the adolescent ego has led to doubts about treatability. Some feel the adolescent is best left to treat himself; finding solutions with some support from the therapist. Others feel that treatment itself is a sort of moratorium to the adolescent in which his life history and development of a therapeutic session can improve his time sense and give a feeling of continuity. Others have stressed the need to adapt psychotherapy to the adolescent. It is important for the psychotherapist to recognize the normal abnormalities of adolescents.

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Beatrix A. Hamburg Coping in Early Adolescence

Coming of age represents the most dramatic example of the complex processes involved in negotiating a critical period of normal development. It illustrates the shifting interplay between the biological, psychological and cultural demands on the individual.  Much of the focus of attention has been on the failures of coping in this era, especially as indicated by higher suicide rates, prevalence of drug abuse and increase in violent behaviors.

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Donald B. Rinsley Residential Treatment of Adolescents

Residential, inpatient, or hospital treatment refers to a comprehensive therapeutic process addressed to the adolescent whose psychopathology is of a degree what warrant his removal from this usual familial and social environments. For such adolescents, residential treatment must provide two basic therapeutic ingredients. It must provide accurate diagnosis, sensitive understanding and adequate psychiatric treatment and it must provide cognitive-intellectual and emotional growth experiences, including education, and occupational, recreational, and vocational modalities.

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Irwin M. Marcus Transition from School to Work

Transition from school to work does involve problems of personality interaction with academic, social and economic factors. The crystallization of the a work personality allows for semiautonomous function. Thus upheavals in nonwork areas of the personality may not necessarily influence work patterns.  On the other hand, disorders in the development of a successful transition from school to work cannot be solved by simply placing the person in a training school.

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James M. Toolan Adolescent Depression and Suicide

Evidence indicates that children under twelve years of age become depressed, but the clinical picture varies considerably from adultss. Younger adolescents may evidence depression by boredom, restlessness, an inability to be alone, a search for new activities, and difficulty in concentration. Suicide is the fourth leading cause of death for 15-19 year olds.  The thesis that depression is a reaction to loss enables us to understand the manifestations of depressive reactions at different ages.

 

 

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Matthew P. Dumont Drug Problems and Their Treatment

Traditional techniques are ineffective.  Individual psychotherapy has shown itself to be incapable of interrupting a pattern of drug dependence in significant numbers of patients. No issue more challenges our traditional techniques. Methadone has not been shown to be an appropriate treatment for youthful drug users. There must be some caution in the widespread experimentation that consigns people to an indefinite opiate addiction.  

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Hilde Bruch Eating Disturbances in Adolescence

The term "eating disturbances" refers to those conditions where body size and manipulation of food intake are used to solve or camouflage inner and outer adjustment problems, i.e. obesity, anorexia nervosa and cachexia. The key issue is the recognition of a profound sense of ineffectiveness, with deficits in control over the body and its functions. Patients need to learn to be aware of self-initiated feelings, thoughts and behavior; gradually developing awareness of participation in the treatment process and how they live their lives.

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John L. Schimel Problems of Delinquency and Their Treatment

Early care of delinquents was largely custodial and disciplinary. Rigorous supervision and accountability, reform, was believed to result in the production of "good citizens." The other trend is the therapeutic or psychiatric which is felt, rather than seen, throughout the entire system, from apprehension by the police, to detention, to court appearances, to training school.  The metaphor is slowly changing from a bad child in a good society to that of a sick/deprived child in a neglectful society.

 

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James F. Masterson Intensive Psychotherapy of the Adolescent with a Borderline Syndrome

Although the borderline adolescent's problem is severe, and therefore his therapeutic requirements high, there is no reason for discouragement.  If we have understood and properly treated the patient's pathology, we will have made it possible for him once again to harness the enormous power of his own inherent growth potential to his own ego development.

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Imre Szecsödy M.D., Ph.D. Dora: Freud's Pygmalion?

Psychoanalysis still rests on what we learn from patients. This is an  investigation of Freud's discoveries - the psychodynamics of hysteria, the role of seduction, the interpretation of dreams,  transference - and at the same time gives us a wide perspective on early psychoanalytic history.

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Irene Matthis Finger-Twisting and Cracked Voices: The Hysterical Symptom Revisited

Freud's early theory—"hysterics suffer mainly from reminiscences"  is moved to a modern theory of semiotics. This adds to Freud's discovery of the symbolic meaning of bodily symptoms by drawing on the field of semiotics, the study of language and symbols.

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What Freud Taught Us About Passionate Romantic Love

Outlines Freud's fundamental contributions to a psychology of love, ideas that grew and developed through Freud's career and comprehensively sums up ideas about romantic love and their relationship to other forms of love, intimacy, and sexuality.

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Stefan Pasternack Freud's Theories of Love and Their Application to Treatment of Love Conflicts

Freud's theories of love are applied to a clinical case. The case of a young man torn between two women presents treatment of a common problem carried out with finesse. It demonstrates the utility of good theory in the hands of a masterful clinician who is able to describe his work in a way that reads like a short story.

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Michael Roth Falling into History: Freud's Case of Frau Emmy von N.

Focuses on Freud's discovering - or rather his "falling into" - the analytic method of listening as as paradigm for understanding history. As he moved from suggestion and hypnosis to listening to his patient's stories, he began to "fall into" analytic space.

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Ernst Falzeder Freud, Freudians, Anti-Freudians: Whose Freud Is It?

History is depicted as a personal and political battlefield. A contemporary statement is made about the transience both of contemporary understanding of history and of our understanding of our patients' dilemmas.

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Allan N. Schore The Right Brain as the Neurobiological Substratum of Freud's Dynamic Unconscious

Affect is the central phenomenon that sits astride the boundary between biological aspects of brain and psychological aspects of mental experience. A great deal of technical neurobiology is summarized in easy-to-read language.

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Steven Ellman Modern Revisions of Freud's Concept of Transference

Freud began by considering transference as the imposition of old situations onto the analysis, and regarded them as a nuisance. Then he recognized that which analysis has taken as axiomatic ever since: transference is the expression of old problems in the current setting. The revisions introduced in the last twenty-five years by various schools are cited.

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Jill Savege Scharff M.D., Editor Freud and Object Relations Theory

Freud's theory of mind is compared with object relations theory as developed by Fairbairn, Klein, Balint, and others. This comparison makes it easier to see Freud's original contributions, and the extension of those paths that has resulted in the relational emphasis in so much current analytic theory.

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Dorothy Evans Holmes Race and Countertransference: Two "Blind Spots" in Psychoanalytic Perception

Demonstrates the power of race to organize defenses against awareness of drive derivatives and how race and countertransference add synergistically.  Both may impede treatment, but when either is made available for reflection, the therapist will be better able to assist the patient to grapple with racially expressed issues.

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Michael Moskowitz Our Moral Universe

This is a social psychological look at racism, anti-semitism, and prejudice as features that have existed throughout history.  Race is a factor in many analyses even when there is no racial difference between analyst and analysand.

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Vamık D. Volkan M.D. Psychoanalysis and Diplomacy: Potentials for and Obstacles Against Collaboration

Discusses obstacles against collaboration between political science and psychoanalysis, but also points to areas where collaboration is possible and can be helpful.  It is clear that the lessons of  psychoanalysis can only be usefully applied by careful study of the fields of international relations and diplomacy.

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C. Fred Alford Narcissism: Socrates, the Frankfurt School, and Psychoanalytic Theory

Alford applies the psychoanalytic theory of narcissism to the philosophies of Socrates and Frankfurt School members Max Horkheimer, Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, and Jurgen Habermas, contending that it can illuminate basic philosophical issues such as the nature of the ideal society, the integrity of the self, and the role of reason in human affairs.

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Judith M. Hughes From Freud's Consulting Room

From Freud's Consulting Room charts the development of Freud's ideas through his clinical work, the successes and failures of his most dramatic and significant case histories, and the creation of a discipline recognizably distinct from its neighbors. Moving from case to case, Hughes has coaxed them into telling a coherent story. Her book has the texture of intellectual history and the compelling quality of a fascinating tale. It leads us to see the origins and development of psychoanalysis in a new way.

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Edward Shorter From the Mind Into the Body

Psychosomatic illness has no apparent physiological cause. By definition, it originates in the mind. But now, in this fascinating work, the foremost authority on the history of psychosomatic illness shows that the forms it takes are in fact a product of something much larger. Symptoms are produced not just by an individual's psychology, but also by one's genetic history and even by the time and culture in which we live.

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